Interior Design Trends in Senior Housing

DGA Builders, LLC pic

DGA Builders, LLC
Image: dgabuilders.com

Tony DiTucci has been the vice president of DGA Builders, LLC, in Pittsford, New York, since 2013. Among his many responsibilities, Tony DiTucci oversees the construction of senior housing facilities.

Pleasant and enjoyable senior living facilities are more than just brick-and-mortar structures. Substantial thought and planning must be invested in the interior design of the buildings to ensure both employee and resident satisfaction.

While the integration of technology into the living space is now routine in senior living residences, there are still areas for improvement. One of these is the use of LED lighting. In addition to the well-known potential for energy savings, the use of LED lights can promote better sleep patterns and reduce anxiety for residents through, for example, the coordination of lamp color with circadian rhythms.

Builders are also creating new senior housing with a greater emphasis on sociability. Dining rooms and fitness centers are increasingly becoming public spaces, and libraries are now often integrated into coffee shops rather than separate rooms to increase social interaction and engagement.

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USGBC’s LEED Green Associate Credential

 

LEED Green Associate Exam pic

LEED Green Associate
Image: usgbc.org

With over 15 years of experience in the construction industry, Tony DiTucci serves as vice president of DGA Builders, LLC, in Pittsford, New York. Dedicated to staying current on the latest industry trends and practices, Tony DiTucci maintains a LEED Green Associate credential.

The LEED Green Associate credential is one of several professional designations offered through the US Green Building Council (USGBC), an organization that promotes sustainable building practices in the construction industry. The Council’s suite of professional credentials gives real estate and construction industry professionals the opportunity to show their commitment to improving sustainability in the design, construction, and maintenance of buildings.

To earn the Green Associate credential, a professional must demonstrate an understanding of various green-building principles by passing a multiple-choice exam. The two-hour exam comprises 100 questions on the LEED process as well as topics such as water efficiency, indoor environmental quality, and energy. Candidates must earn a score of 170 out of 200 to pass the test and become a LEED Green Associate.

Certified Green Associates must earn 15 continuing education (CE) hours every two years to maintain the credential. Professionals can earn CE credits by completing educational courses, working on LEED projects, and publishing articles or books on LEED-related topics. Credits can also be earned by volunteering for green-building projects. Those who earn their Green Associate credential can go on to earn LEED AP specialty credentials in several areas, including building design and construction, operations and maintenance, and neighborhood development.